Shaping the Future of Readiness: A Discussion and Facilitation Guide

Publication
January 30, 2018

By: Katie King, Katherine Prince, Jason Swanson

This discussion guide aims to assist communities in supporting meaningful discussions that lead to concrete next steps that support future workforce development.Employment, educational and community leaders face a critical window of choice. Even today, graduates’ skill sets and employers’ needs are often out of sync. As explored in KnowledgeWorks’ strategic foresight publications, work is changing rapidly, which could widen that gap. Exponential advances in digital technologies, the rise of smart machines and the decline of full-time employment suggest that our future could look dramatically different from today’s realities. By looking at changes on the horizon, leaders have the opportunity to redefine readiness for this new era and align their work to meet learners’, workers’ and employers’ future needs. Due to the magnitude of change on the horizon, no one organization or system can address future readiness needs on its own. The level and pace of change require both long-term thinking and cross-sector action.

Shaping the Future of Readiness: A Discussion and Facilitation Guide© aims to assist community conveners in supporting meaningful multi-sector and action-oriented discussions that lead to concrete next steps that support future workforce development.

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THE AUTHORS

Katie King
Senior Director of Strategic Engagement
Katherine Prince
Vice President of Strategic Foresight
Jason Swanson
Senior Director of Strategic Foresight

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