Supporting Districts as the Learning Ecosystem Expands

Like it or not, the learning ecosystem is expanding.  As education goes through a time of disintermediation, learners and their families will have many options for deciding what learning experiences they consume, in what ways and in what combinations.  Not Continue reading

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Transforming District Governance: Exploring Education in the Year 2025 with NSBA

At the National School Board Association’s annual conference, I had the pleasure of sharing insights from KnowledgeWorks’ strategic foresight publications through a session on education in the year 2025. As we explored what the emergence of a vibrant and adaptive Continue reading

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New Value Propositions for De-Institutionalizing Times

When presenting as part of a panel on the changing cultural and social landscape at the Center for American Jewish Museums’ (CAJM) annual retreat, I was struck by the extent to which the questions about mission, relevance, and ongoing viability Continue reading

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Forecasting Student Needs in 2025 and Beyond

Last month I had the pleasure of attending the Houston Foresight spring gathering, where I learned about developing research on the future of student needs in 2025 and beyond that the Lumina Foundation has commissioned from the program. The Student Continue reading

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It’s Time for Transformation

Yesterday the Donnell-Kay Foundation announced ReSchool Colorado, “a game changing, multi-year effort to create a new state public education system where learning is reimagined and students graduate energized and equipped to thrive in a rapidly changing world.” It aims to be, as they put it, “transformative to the core,” recreating the whole system of learning to prepare today’s students for an emerging world whose contours we can only partially anticipate today. Continue reading

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The Reality of Custodial Care

“Let’s face it, parents want schools to provide free babysitting,” a district superintendent said in one of my recent workshops on the future of learning. Although I hadn’t framed it that way, I’d been thinking about this dimension of the many services besides learning that the current public education system provides when considering the demands that creating more flexible combinations of learning experiences could make on parents and families. Continue reading

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A Local Responsibility

When leading a workshop on the future of learning for the New Mexico Coalition of Educational Leaders last week, Katherine Prince was struck by the ways in which the conversation kept cycling back toward two seemingly disparate but intricately intersecting themes:

- The need for the new learning ecosystem to be led by learning agents who manage decisions with learners and their families locally and
- The need to cultivate wide ownership for learning among families and across businesses, communities, and other stakeholder groups. Continue reading

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Think Regionally, Act Locally

District participants at a recent Connecticut Association of Public School Superintendents workshop on the future of learning emphasized the potential to pursue regional solutions that can meet the needs of more learners, instead of every district’s struggling to meet every need on its own. They saw the potential both for districts to collaborate in creating regional solutions today and for those solutions to open the way toward even greater innovation tomorrow. As we looked ten years out and envisioned the best possibilities for learning, participants saw such boundary-spanning as a strategy that they could employ today to move toward a personalized future of learning that truly meets the needs of all students. Continue reading

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A Nation More at Risk

Looking back at where we’ve come since the publication of “A Nation at Risk” thirty years ago from the perspective of looking ahead to the trends shaping learning ten years out provided, as my colleague Jesse Moyer anticipated in his related post, much food for thought and commentary.

Given my focus on looking ahead toward a vibrant learning ecosystem in which all learners have the opportunity and support to prepare to their fullest for college, career, and civic life – which would represent a profound system transformation from an industrial to an ecological paradigm – it struck me that the report’s authors wrote of “the task of rebuilding our system of learning” (14). Continue reading

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