July 28, 2017
How do we prepare students for jobs that don't even exist yet? That’s a question that has a lot of people taking a closer look at both our education system and our current definitions of readiness.

Getting Students Ready for the Future, When We Don’t Know What the Future Holds

How do we prepare students for jobs that don’t even exist yet? That’s a question that has a lot of people taking a closer look at both our education system and our current definitions of readiness.

In a recent article for edCircuit, KnowledgeWorks Director of Strategic Foresight Jason Swanson shares some trends that are shaping the future of work as well as our definitions of readiness for that work. Those trends include a greater prevalence and sophistication of artificial intelligence (AI), more and more automation of work and a more of the population participating in the gig economy.

These trends are just that – trends – so there are still many unknowns as we plan for the future. “What we do know is that work is changing; what we don’t know is to what extent,” said Swanson.

But there are some things we can do now to prepare the students of today for the jobs of tomorrow. For instance, Swanson suggests that we can start helping students “cultivate deep self-knowledge and meta-cognitive skills.” Helping students develop and apply social-emotional skills will help them both in and out of the classroom.

More research about planning for the future of readiness is available in “The Future of Learning: Redefining Readiness from the Inside Out,” which explores three core skills needed to succeed in the future workforce:

  1. Deep self-knowledge
  2. Emotional regulation
  3. Empathy and perspective taking

Read Swanson’s article in edCircuit, “Preparing For An Uncertain Future Of Work,” to learn more about his research into readiness.

Download “The Future of Learning: Redefining Readiness from the Inside Out” for an in-depth look at the readiness skills students may need to be successful in the future.

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Kate Westrich

Written by: Kate Westrich

Kate Westrich manages digital marketing for KnowledgeWorks, tweeting for @KnowledgeWorks and @EdPersonalized, and posting at KnowledgeWorks' Facebook, LinkedIn, Google+, YouTube and Pinterest pages.

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