Our new video, “Competency Education and Personalized Learning,” explores the differences between competency-based and traditional school models.

A look into the classroom: Competency vs. traditional education

Every child is different. Each learner has unique strengths, interests, personality traits and interests. The key to competency education is the ability to tailor learning to each student’s strengths, interests and passions.

At KnowledgeWorks, we root our work in the idea that every child is capable of success. We recognize that educators have always tried to do their best to support the needs of every learner. But unfortunately, our current, time-based system hasn’t always given us the flexibility to do that.

Our new video, “Competency Education and Personalized Learning,” explores the differences between competency-based and traditional school models. It also provides greater insight into what personalized learning looks like in the classroom.

This video features students, parents and teachers from Regional School Unit 2 (RSU 2), a district that has been leading the way with competency education. Thanks to the entire district for your continued kindness and insight as we strive to make competency education a reality for students throughout the country.

Here are some examples of how a competency classroom differs from traditional:

  1. In traditional school settings, students can move through grade levels even if they only understand 60 percent of the material.
  2. Personalized learning, particularly competency education, flips the current model on its head to put each student at the center of their education.
  3. Students, parents and educators have a shared understanding of the knowledge and skills each child is expected to learn.
  4. In a competency-based environment, each student has a set of clear learning targets and knows what they need to do to succeed.
  5. Students can make choices for how they demonstrate what they’ve learned.
  6. Competency education builds a school culture that empowers educators to build a culture and vision in the classroom while facilitating learning and preparing students for success.
  7. Through competency education, every student is challenged and every child succeeds.

Watch the video to learn more about competency education.

Contact us to learn more about transitioning to a competency-based approach.

Virgel Hammonds

Written by: Virgel Hammonds

Virgel Hammonds is the proud daddy of two, a life-long educator / learner and the Chief Learning Officer of KnowledgeWorks.

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