Creating and Adapting to the “New Job Description”

Posts from Strive - Tue, 2012-04-24 11:01

I was just recently part of a discussion with several of the Strive Cradle to Career communities about how they’re working to promote shared accountability within networks that are building collaborative action plans.

It became clear throughout the conversation that this is one of the toughest challenges that partnerships wrestle through.  There is no denying it – collaborative action is hard work.  It requires a level of collaboration that goes beyond rhetoric, to a place where partners are asked to set aside individual agendas, change behaviors and adopt new practices. It is time-consuming in that being data-driven means being willing to take the time to analyze and make difficult decisions.  And in most cases, it requires network partners to do something that is above and beyond their “day jobs.”

As the discussion continued, Dan Ryan of All Hands Raised in Portland stressed that we need to be “writing a new job description,” one which includes collaborative action as one of the core competencies.  This will likely require partners to re-evaluate all of their many responsibilities and prioritize authentic collaboration around a shared vision and common measures, with the expectation that this type of action will get to improved outcomes.

Geoff Zimmerman of the Strive Partnership in Cincinnati, Newport and Covington added that we must find a balance between how much support and capacity the backbone provides to the collaborative action work, with how much we expect partners to change how they’ve been operating in order to adapt to the “new job description.”  If the backbone provides too much support, partners will not change their behavior and this work cannot be sustained.

So the questions are: how do we write the new job description for this work, making collaborative action a critical competency for our partners’ “day jobs”; and as backbone support organizations, how do we provide the right balance of capacity building and support to catalyze systemic change and make sure our partners don’t want to quit their “day jobs?”

Categories: Blog

The Beautiful Side of “Enlightened Self-Interest”

Posts from Strive - Tue, 2012-03-20 09:39

Working with a few sites recently, I came to realize that “enlightened self-interest” is a beautiful thing.  It’s often referred to in the negative because of the perception that people are being selfish if they think about how the partnership work could help an individual partner succeed. But in the end, real and sustainable partnerships do have to meet the unique needs of each partner while serving the common good.

As a practical example, these sites are all having trouble getting one or two sectors to actively engage in the partnership work.  When we thought this through with them, we realized we really needed to capture both what would likely bring them to the table AND what could be keeping them away.  In the end, this matrix will have to be tailored for the needs of each partner. Doing this by sector can get you a good start, helping you to understand what would be the “enlightened self-interest” of the partner to actively engage in the work.  These sites now have plans with concrete talking points for how to get the much needed and critically important partners actively involved.

In the end, each partner will need the work of a cradle to career partnership, and the civic infrastructure that emerges, to meet their own mission and goals.  Because, in the end, it is the alignment of all these efforts that will lead to long-term success.   And that really is in all of our “enlightened collective interest.”

Categories: Blog