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Cradle to Career language included in District Race to the Top Draft Regulations

Posts from Strive - Fri, 2012-06-08 13:27

Exciting news for the Strive Network! Cradle to Career language has been included in draft regulations for District Race to the Top program.

Included in the recently released draft is a competitive preference priority for Cradle-to-Career Results, Resource Alignment and Integrated Services. This is a great moment for the Strive Network, and a testament to the work that is being done in communities across the country to build cradle to career civic infrastructure.  The inclusion of this priority validates our collective work, and is evidence of the value the Department places on these types of partnerships in helping to drive innovation and improvement in student achievement.

You can read the language here:  http://www.ed.gov/race-top/district-competition/competititive-preference-priority

Since these are draft regulations, we encourage you all to submit comments in support of this language throughout the comment period – which ends today.  You can submit public comment here: http://www.ed.gov/comment/reply/12250#comment-form

The final regulations will be released in July.

Be on the lookout for more information about webinars that we are planning to co-host with partners such as the United Way Worldwide and Promise Neighborhoods Institute to think through how communities doing this type of work can ensure programs and resources are aligned in order to participate in this competition.

Finally, we hope you will all take a moment to celebrate this recognition of the hard work you are doing every day!

Categories: Blog

Communications Toolkit for Strive Network Members Unveiled

Posts from Strive - Thu, 2012-05-24 12:33

Yesterday, more than 30 Strive Network communities participated in a Network-member webinar focused on the different ways that these Cradle to Career partnerships can best communicate their work to the media and to local community members. After Carly Rospert, Communications & Strategic Assistance Associate for the Strive Network, unveiled the brand new Communications Toolkit, two panelists (myself and Director of Public Relations at KnowledgeWorks, Byron McCauley) spoke to communities about how they could communicate their work locally using both traditional and social media outlets.

Working in the Marketing and Communications group at KnowledgeWorks, one of my responsibilities is to support both the Strive Network and the Strive Partnership with their communication needs – which range from editing documents, to conducting interviews, to creating content, to managing their social media. Having managed social media for both, I’ve seen how powerful a platform it is for connecting, amplifying, and networking.

During the Strive Partnership’s tutoring campaign, Be the Change, social media was just one of the mediums used to get the word out. @StriveTogether pushed out information and news articles about the campaign, whose goal was to recruit 2000 tutors for students in Cincinnati Public Schools. After a few tweets were sent out, one community follower replied simply, “Where is the link to apply?” I responded with the link, and the follower soon signed up to become a tutor at a local elementary school.

Both @AchieveGuilford and @Learn4LifeCbus reached out to the @StriveNetwork via social media when their Cradle to Career partnerships were taking shape and establishing themselves. These connections, which were followed by emails and collaboration plans, led to an Op-Ed from Jeff Edmondson that ran in Guilford, coordinated in part by @AchieveGuilford; and social media guidance for @Learn4LifeCbus, which helped inspire the new Communications Toolkit.

Building off of these experiences and many, many more, we were able to form the Strive Network Communications Toolkit.  Yesterday’s webinar was a great success, and we’re happy to announce that the new Toolkit is now available for Strive Network members. To access it, log on to the Strive Network Partner Portal.

And if you haven’t already, like the Strive Network on Facebook and follow us on Twitter!

Categories: Blog

Creating and Adapting to the “New Job Description”

Posts from Strive - Tue, 2012-04-24 11:01

I was just recently part of a discussion with several of the Strive Cradle to Career communities about how they’re working to promote shared accountability within networks that are building collaborative action plans.

It became clear throughout the conversation that this is one of the toughest challenges that partnerships wrestle through.  There is no denying it – collaborative action is hard work.  It requires a level of collaboration that goes beyond rhetoric, to a place where partners are asked to set aside individual agendas, change behaviors and adopt new practices. It is time-consuming in that being data-driven means being willing to take the time to analyze and make difficult decisions.  And in most cases, it requires network partners to do something that is above and beyond their “day jobs.”

As the discussion continued, Dan Ryan of All Hands Raised in Portland stressed that we need to be “writing a new job description,” one which includes collaborative action as one of the core competencies.  This will likely require partners to re-evaluate all of their many responsibilities and prioritize authentic collaboration around a shared vision and common measures, with the expectation that this type of action will get to improved outcomes.

Geoff Zimmerman of the Strive Partnership in Cincinnati, Newport and Covington added that we must find a balance between how much support and capacity the backbone provides to the collaborative action work, with how much we expect partners to change how they’ve been operating in order to adapt to the “new job description.”  If the backbone provides too much support, partners will not change their behavior and this work cannot be sustained.

So the questions are: how do we write the new job description for this work, making collaborative action a critical competency for our partners’ “day jobs”; and as backbone support organizations, how do we provide the right balance of capacity building and support to catalyze systemic change and make sure our partners don’t want to quit their “day jobs?”

Categories: Blog

The Beautiful Side of “Enlightened Self-Interest”

Posts from Strive - Tue, 2012-03-20 09:39

Working with a few sites recently, I came to realize that “enlightened self-interest” is a beautiful thing.  It’s often referred to in the negative because of the perception that people are being selfish if they think about how the partnership work could help an individual partner succeed. But in the end, real and sustainable partnerships do have to meet the unique needs of each partner while serving the common good.

As a practical example, these sites are all having trouble getting one or two sectors to actively engage in the partnership work.  When we thought this through with them, we realized we really needed to capture both what would likely bring them to the table AND what could be keeping them away.  In the end, this matrix will have to be tailored for the needs of each partner. Doing this by sector can get you a good start, helping you to understand what would be the “enlightened self-interest” of the partner to actively engage in the work.  These sites now have plans with concrete talking points for how to get the much needed and critically important partners actively involved.

In the end, each partner will need the work of a cradle to career partnership, and the civic infrastructure that emerges, to meet their own mission and goals.  Because, in the end, it is the alignment of all these efforts that will lead to long-term success.   And that really is in all of our “enlightened collective interest.”

Categories: Blog
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